It is currently Mon Nov 19, 2018 4:43 pm


Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

Threads for all your painting and modelling blogs as well as hobby tutorials
  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

RollinAllOnes

  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2014 4:32 pm

Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostMon Dec 08, 2014 3:11 am

Hello all!

My name's Andrew, and I run a small commission service in Northern Ohio. Recently I was contacted by a member on DakkaDakka regarding a possible job painting up his Shaltari force. To be honest, I hadn't even heard of the game, and when i got the minis in I was SHOCKED! Absolutely incredible detail, and thus far it's been a treat to paint them. Very impressed with the scale.

He wanted a blue and white scheme (a popular color for Shaltari, it seems, if this forum is any indication ;) ). I came up with the scheme shown below for the prototype miniature. In particular, I was inspired by Mike Mee's gorgeous Shaltari here

Image

I'll be posting updates as they become available here. Who knows, An army of my very own might be in the future!

Till next time, thanks for reading!
Image
Offline
User avatar

Creeping Dementia

  • Posts: 611
  • Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2014 1:10 pm

Re: Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostMon Dec 08, 2014 4:27 am

Lookin good! Welcome aboard
Offline
User avatar

Ljevid

Hawk Talon

  • Posts: 828
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 9:11 am

Re: Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostMon Dec 08, 2014 8:07 am

Welcome,

Beautiful color gradient. :D

Yeah - the detail on those minis is awesome... Wait until you get some of the new Resistance-who in their right mind would design the undercarriage of busses with all the details possible :lol:

How about building in a third color - like giving the drop shaped leg armor more color?

No idea how much creative space you have in this commission ;)

Regards

Ljevid
Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man ON fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life...
Offline
User avatar

RollinAllOnes

  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2014 4:32 pm

Re: Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostMon Dec 08, 2014 6:20 pm

Thanks, you guys!

@Ljevid: The client is pretty much set on the scheme shown, but there is a bit more to the leg armor than the photo seems to show. My camera seems to be showing its age, and with it the photos tend to be hit and miss. The "solar panels" (as I've come to view them) on all the minis will have bright orange dots on the black. It shows up better on this test Yari:

Image

This more along what you were thinking?




A better camera and photo setup is on the wish list this year, so hopefully I'll have something a little more workable soon :)
Till next time!
Image
Offline

Hexer

  • Posts: 339
  • Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2014 8:46 am

Re: Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostTue Dec 09, 2014 6:51 am

sweeeet :)
Offline
User avatar

Nodri

  • Posts: 99
  • Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:26 pm
  • Location: Denver, CO

Re: Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostThu Dec 11, 2014 3:02 am

Your brush & airbrush skills are solid. The dark blue to white transition is nicely done, particularly considering the small size. I also appreciate the use of more traditional brushwork to bring out the fine details. It helps to bring life to the model.

I can't imagine that your client will be anything but happy with the results.

If your client is willing to pay a premium for a centerpiece model (i.e. a Firedrake), you could do a couple things to take the paint job further.

First, the orange and green dots could be painted as lenses rather than flat colors. This would offer a jewel-encrusted look and bring more depth but would also be lots of additional brushwork. Secondly, you could blend the canopies from black to dark red with the airbrush. Red & green are complimentary and would complete a tetrad with the blue & orange. It would be easiest to paint the canopies first, mask them off, and then airbrush the body.
Passion has little to do with euphoria and everything to do with patience. It is not about feeling good. It is about endurance. Like patience, passion comes from the same Latin root: pati. It does not mean to flow with exuberance. It means to suffer.
Offline
User avatar

RollinAllOnes

  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2014 4:32 pm

Re: Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostSun Dec 14, 2014 6:49 pm

Thank you kindly!

Client was SUPER happy, so gave me the go-ahead on the rest of the army. As far as the canopies, he really likes them straight black like the studio minis. The triad is still going to be showing up on the skimmers, as we decided to make bases for them. They will be painted a very rusty reddish color, so very Martian or Australian Outback!
I did pitch the idea of a super showpiece Firedrake (as theres one in the total army), but he mentioned that he'd rather keep them all to a similar level, plus we were at the edge of his budget for the army!
I will certainly be keeping it in mind, though, for my own inevitable army. I REALLY like the jewel encrusted idea!!


So anywho, with the go-ahead from the boss, I wasted no time and threw on the base gradients over the past couple days:

Image

Then it was off to the Oil Wash! For those who may be interested in the process, allow me to give a very brief tutorial:
==============================================================

Washing with Oils

Compared to your standard acrylic-based washes, there are some key differences when using oils. First and foremost, using an oil wash over gloss varnish ensures that the color underneath stays pure (no staining), and that the recesses get a good amount of pigment. A bonus to this is that OMS has considerably lower surface tension than water, so the wash will literally be sucked into cracks and panel lines! Then once its all dry, you can clean up the lines easily with a little OMS on a qtip or paintbrush. The wash comes right off of the gloss!

Now, I'm unsure if there are pre-made ones available, but why buy when they are so easy to make yourself!

You will need:
Mineral Spirits (Im using Odorless Mineral Spirits here)
Artist's-Grade Oil paints- more on this in a little bit
An old brush that you can dedicate to the task (you dont want to use this for acrylics afterwards)
A mixing cup

Image

Now why Artist's oils? Those can be expensive, Andrew, and why cant I just use this dollar-a-tube oil paint!?
The answer to this is simple: You get what you pay for!
I recommend Artist oils over "student" oils for a number of reasons: First, the pigment will be ground finer in Art oils, giving your wash a much smoother finish. Secondly, the paint will have more pigment in it, so you will need less to make the same amount of wash. Finally, and this bit is a bit subjective, I think the art oils dissolve more readily in OMS than student oils.
So dont fret if you see a 40mL tube for 10 bucks. For our uses, one tube will last for years! I have had this particular tube of black for 2 years, and have only just started to crimp the bottom of the tube!


Ok, so you have your supplies.
Take your oil paint and squeeze a pea-sized dollop into the mixing cup. This stuff is quite a bit thicker than acrylics, and you might need to "cut" the paint off once you squeeze enough out of the tube. Just use your mixing brush!
Image

Now add in a bit of mineral spirits. I used about 7.5 mL fo mine. Its hard to explain the consistency you want to achieve, but when your wash is thick enough it will be homogeneous (no lumps!), and you will be able to paint a thin, dark line with it (the bottom of the napkin here is perfect)
Image


Now, you will want to take your miniature and give it a coat or two of gloss. Let this set for AT LEAST a few hours before you apply the oil wash! Otherwise, you risk re-dissolving the gloss, and destroying the paint underneath!

Before:
Image

After:
Image

Dont worry about being super neat. you just want to make sure there are no big globs of paint in your details! Cleanup comes after several hours of drying. Oils take a lot longer than acrylics to dry, and you don't want to put paint (even varnish) over still wet oil paint. If you do that, you're gonna have a bad time.

After a couple hours, the paint should look dry. At this stage, take a brush dipped in a little clean OMS, and brush off rough areas of wash and neaten up your recesses. It should be super easy thanks to our gloss coat!

Let these dry overnight after cleaning, then spray with a matte varnish. You are now ready to keep painting details!




Now... Here is where I made a grievous mistake...
It was getting late, so I figured I could let the other half of the army sit overnight, and I would come back in the morning...

As I sat and resumed cleaning, I started to notice that it was harder and harder to remove. Areas of the surface were stained darker, and I was even starting to scrub off areas of paint!! :(
Image

The extra drying time let the OMS and oil paint eat away at the gloss (very slowly), and then bonded to the paint underneath. Not. Happy.
Bah! Well, hopefully I can fix these up alright. Watch out for oil washes, folks! They're super useful, but you need to treat them with respect, or they'll bite you.

In short, learn from my mistake!! Once you start to put oil washes on models, YOU MUST FINISH THAT SAME DAY! Dont let this stuff sit on your models and harden overnight!

Till next time! Thanks for reading!
Image
Offline
User avatar

Ljevid

Hawk Talon

  • Posts: 828
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 9:11 am

Re: Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostMon Dec 15, 2014 8:24 am

Very, very nice(!!!)

I love the color gradient. Good job.

As it happens I had the same problem as you. I usually work in an assembly line style. Paint several model at a time - do one step for all models, return to the first model - do the second step and so on.

I had noticed before that the oil wash didn't work as usual, but I had to screw up a whole batch of Scourge before I discarded it at last... They were completely stained black with no chance to rub it off :(

The solution is rather easy - washes by Flory Models: http://www.florymodels.co.uk/washes/

Far less aggressive - and they work the same way, just better.
They are "clay" based (as far as I know) - Gloss coat, apply the wash liberally, let it dry (doesn't matter how long), wipe away what you don't need with a moist tissue until you have the effect you want (leave some to get a little dirty look or wipe it down until only the lines show). If you wipe away too much, just apply more wash and try again.

That stuff is especially helpful if you want crisp lines for your PHR or UCM.

Keep us posted

Regards
Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man ON fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life...
Offline
User avatar

Mike Mee

  • Posts: 638
  • Joined: Sun Apr 28, 2013 8:40 pm
  • Location: Manchester, UK.

Re: Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostThu Dec 18, 2014 9:01 pm

RollinAllOnes wrote:In particular, I was inspired by Mike Mee's gorgeous Shaltari here


Flattered as always ;)

They look ace dude, I still have to paint all my models :? I will get around to it some day.
Offline
User avatar

Nodri

  • Posts: 99
  • Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:26 pm
  • Location: Denver, CO

Re: Rollin' All Ones -- Commissions and my journey into DzC

PostSat Dec 20, 2014 4:32 am

RollinAllOnes,


Thanks for the tutorial! I'm looking at beginning to experiment with oil washes and this post was very informative.

With regards to your issues with the oils staining the model, the problem may be that you're using mineral spirits as a thinner. A better option may be to use odorless paint thinner because it's far more gentle.

Here in the US, you can pick up Mona Lisa odorless thinner at Hobby Lobby or Michael's (and use a 40% off coupon to boot :D).

Image

Based on the research I've done so far, the solvent strength of an oil thinner is directly related to the quantity of aromatic hydrocarbons in the thinner. The stronger the smell, the stronger the thinner. Strong thinners are best used for cleaning brushes or stripping paint. Odorless thinners have been further refined and are best used to thin oil paints without causing damage to the underlying surface.

The scale modeling community has been using oils over acrylic paint & varnish for ages. They often discuss allowing oils to dry for days or even weeks before blending depending upon the desired result, especially when blending oils on top of oils. This can only be possible with gentler thinners. There are thinners available specifically for use with models, but I get the feeling that they are little more than repackaged odorless thinners (This may or may not be 100% accurate; I'm still learning).

There is some great information on the composition of oil paints (including pigments, binders, solvents, etc.) on the Royal Talens web site. They've been making oil paints since about 1900, so I figure they know what they're talking about.

From a personal standpoint, everything I've said here is theory. I do, however, want to learn how to use oils to their full advantage and will be starting that process with my UCM. While I'm still in the middle of gap-filling-hell, researching the cool stuff I wanna paint has been a necessary break and a helpful motivator.

As a final note, water-soluble oil paints have become available in the last few years from several manufacturers. They claim to have the appearance and blending traits of oils but are as easy to use and clean up as acrylics. I've not yet found any information with regards to their applications in scale modeling, but have just recently begun to look into them. Googling "water soluble oil paints" will provide a wealth of information.
Passion has little to do with euphoria and everything to do with patience. It is not about feeling good. It is about endurance. Like patience, passion comes from the same Latin root: pati. It does not mean to flow with exuberance. It means to suffer.
Next

Return to Blogs and Tutorials

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests